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augment_me

augment_me

augment_me is a responsive visual database; a memory machine of sorts, but a live and constantly evolving one. The images constituting the database are a sequence of photographs and videos collected over the past eight years and track Brad Miller’s relationships with people, things, places and scenarios borne of the everyday. These images are embedded by the augment_me software into an live animation feed, isolating and recontextualising moments in the artist's life - which oscillate between banal and beautiful. The work document and transform these snippets of time and memory into disassociated fragments and then reassociated narratives. Making manifest the manipulative nature of memory, the work plays on the latent mnemonic ability of the viewer to make his/her reality shift, appear, and disappear. augment_me does this by responding to the presence of its audience through a camera and sensor installed in the exhibition space. The motions of the viewer literally make or unmake the images projected in the live feed as well as altering the dynamics (changes in volume and frequency) in the sonic environment. This audio is produced via a granular synthesis system - a basic sound synthesis method that operates on a micro sound-time scale. augment_me borrows sound samples from its own environment to create a live and interactive soundscape. 

augment_me offers a manipalable narrative; one that bends and warps in the mere presence of an audience or observer. In doing so, the work makes tangible the fundamental problems at the heart of identity - namely, its contingency on a selective and imperfect system of recording experience: memory. As a living, breathing database, augment_me not only records and presents the viewer with a personalised history – it offers itself as a critical exploration of the problematic relationship between memory and identity. 

augment_me was supported by an Australia Council New Work grant. 

Project date

2009

Funding type

Government

People

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